Referanser fra forskning og faglitteratur om å lese ofte

  • “Barn som har blitt pratet med og lest mye for siden fødselen vil ha hørt 32 millioner flere ord ved 4 år enn barn som ikke fikk høre så mye språk.”(Betty Hart and Todd R. Risley, cited in ‘American Educator, Spring 2003 “The Early Catastrophe”)
  • “Vi kan ikke lære å prate ved 2 år med mindre vi har blitt pratet med. Lytte forståelse bestemmer lese forståelse.” (Blakemore, North County Times, 2006)
  • “Babier som ble lest for regelmessig siden de begynte ved 6 månder hadde 40% økning i mottagelig vokabular (receptive vocabulary) da de ble 18 måneder gamle. Babier i studiet som ikke ble lest for hadde bare 16% økning i mottagelig vokabular.” (Quoted fromwww.readtoyourbaby.com, from research done by P.C. High, MD and associates at Child Development Centre at Rhode Island Hospital, see Pediatrics, vol 105, no 4, april 2000.)
  • “jo mer foreldrene leste, jo bedre ble barnets vokabular, som igjen oppmuntret til mer lesing…”(Raikes, H. Child Development, July/August 2006; vol 7. News release, Society for Research in Child Development.)
  • “Ved åtte måneder kan babyer gjenkjenne spesifikke ord opp til to uker etter at de har hørt dem gjentatte ganger fra en bok – en god grunn for å begynne å lese for babyen tidlig og ofte!” (Lise Eliot, Ph.D., “What’s Going on in There? How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life, 1999, p. 341).
  •  “Words are the basis of literacy, the ability to read and write. In order to succeed in school, children need to pay attention to, listen to, remember, understand and speak words. These basic skills form the building blocks of literacy. Your baby acquires these building blocks naturally in the first years of life, but only if you set aside time every day to lovingly read and talk to your baby.” (C.J.Blakemore & B.W.Ramirez, “Baby Read Aloud Basics, 2006 )
  • The baby learns how to use language through listening to how the parent speaks. Before 6 months of age, the baby can learn any language it is exposed to as it focuses on the rhythm of the language. After 8 months baby focus on the sounds of their own language (s) and loose the ability to hear and produce sounds in other languages. After one year of age, the brain specialises in the language it hears at home. (Golinkoff and Hirsh-Pasek, How Babies Talk, p.23)
  • The child can easily become bilingual if spoken two languages to, what is most important is that the baby hears both languages right from birth, and hears a lot of both. Words and concepts learned in one language, easily transfers to another.
  • “The parent is the most important teacher the child will have during the first two years of life – and possibly the first five. It is within the parent’s power to give the baby the gift of words. Recent research indicates that future academic success is the amount of words a baby hears before the ages of two!” (Betty Hart and Todd Risley, 1996) 
  • “During the first months and years of life, children’s experiences with language and literacy can begin to form a basis for their later reading success”. (Starting Out Right: A Guide to Promoting Children’s Reading Success published by the US National Research Council’s Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children)
  • “Reading and writing skills begin at birth, when a baby is exposed to language. Establishing a reading routine early is important for babies and parents, too!” (Blakemore & Ramirez, North County Times, 2006)
  • “If the child has never heard the word, the child will never say the word; and if you have neither heard it nor said it, it’s pretty tough to read it and write it.” (Jim Trealease, author of “The Read-Aloud Handbook, 1999”).